Looks

All About Proportion

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This one goes out to all the petite ladies out there who have been told they cannot wear curtain styles, like the trapeze dress. That is 100% a fashion myth. This style, also known as the tent dress, belongs to everyone. It can be worn beautifully by the tall, small, thin, and curvy. The key to this silhouette, as well as any fashion, is PROPORTION, PROPORTION, PROPORTION.

The first “P” is for proportion of length. I designed this dress for my body, which is a petite 5’2″. This means my hemlines are shorter than the industry standard, because I am shorter than the industry standard. If I had purchased this off the rack, the hemline in the front would have most likely cut me at the knee (this would have significantly shortened the look of my legs). Having the front hemline hit me several inches above the knee, while sweeping down in the back, provides the illusion of distance. And distance reads as lengthy legs.

The second “P” is for proportion of fabric. I strategically controlled the volume of fabric to serve my shape. The front of the dress is significantly less full, allowing me to carry this look. In the back of the dress I added chevroning seams, which create 3 tiers. Each tier has more volume than the next, so the dress gets exponentially fuller as the fabric cascades.

The third “P” is for proportion of design elements. The black sequin appliqué was a bold choice made on purpose. The strong look of the yoke emphasizes the shoulders, which helps me carry such a large silhouette. The yoke also extends a little beyond my natural shoulder, making my frame looking broader than it actually is. The open back is also an important design detail that helps me pull off such a full garment. The back cutout helps restore the balance between the amount of fabric used and the surface area of my body.

Do you have a style you have always wanted to wear, but struggle to find the one that looks good? I am officially open for business and taking clients! I would love to make THAT dress for you!

Love in Fashion,

Sydney

Photos by Danielle Goodman

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Looks

Open Runway 2017

Summer weather may be dragging its feet, but the Boston fashion scene was heating up at Open Runway 2017!  Smack in the center of Boston’s Downtown Crossing, the fashion show took place on the newly iconic stone steps. Tourists, passersby, and business men and women alike were able to experience a taste of what new and emerging Boston designers have to say. With rows of designer/model duos ascending the stairs, it was a perfect picture of the best of what Boston has to offer. It was a colorful fusion of silhouette and style, with the designers and models to match. The mix of talent was diverse and dynamic, as were the clothes exhibited.  It’s the mixed bag of the Boston fashion scene; one I am proud to be a part of!

Something that is unique to Boston is the inclusive, supportive, and collaborative nature of the local industry. As a blogger, and now a designer, I am always moved by the local industry mentality; a success for one is a success for all of us. Congrats to all the amazing designers that showed their work at Open Runway. Let’s keep designing and continue to develop Boston as the amazing fashion hub it is!

Love in Fashion,

Sydney

Photos by Olga Photo and Iggy Barskov

Shout out to Jay Calderin for an amazing event!

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Looks, Uncategorized

A Farewell to Bare Arms

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Whether you’re in the throws of back to school or back to the real world, we’ve all flipped our post Labor Day switch. However, before diving headfirst onto the Halloween anticipating, hot toddy train… I have one more look before quitting this summer cold turkey.

My last ensemble of the season boasts a modern take on a vintage silhouette. I gave the 1950s New Look a makeover by incorporating two of this summer’s hottest trends; the two piece dress and cropped top. Although I adapted this classic look to include on trend elements, the period styling is the soul of this dress. When designing my look, I wanted to convey the sentimental charm of the 1950s. Designed for the true romantic, the pink full-bodied skirt is both flirtatious and demure.

Saying goodbye to the simple elegance of summer clothes is always bittersweet. However, after bidding farewell to the light, bright, backless, and strapless, the memory of frolicking around Boston in this outfit will stay with me through the coldest days of winter.

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Uncategorized

American Dream

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I don’t know what I’ve been anticipating more… the long weekend, or the perfect occasion to wear this vintage style dress! I found it at Tatyana, a vintage pin-up store in the heart of Nashville, Tennessee. Walking down the main drag, the city booms with the sounds of live music, it buzzes with excited tourists, and sizzles in the heat of the southern sunshine. With some good whiskey and a bit of county on my mind, this vintage red, white, and blue dress was the cherry on top of a true American adventure!

This feature however, was not shot in Nashville, but it was shot on location in Boca Raton, Florida, at the Polo Club. With the surroundings of the perfectly manicured lawns, pristine golf courses, and families toting to and from the pool, it was the perfect backdrop for this all-american shoot.  The dress is undeniably USA themed, though the vintage cut gives it a more subtle, familiar, and classic feel. I decided to pair the dress with a black leather jacket, a staple I associate with America, freedom, and the open road.

Stars or stripes? Red, white, or blue? Whatever you decide to wear this July 4th, have some fun and show some styling spirit! Cheers, and happy birthday to the USA!

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Looks

Pop Art

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For spring 2015 soft silhouettes in dewy blues, frosted pinks, and pristine whites fill the streets and our closets. With spring style in full bloom, it seems as though the whimsical fashions have us all living in a pastel haze and white washed day dream. While I love this ethereal esthetic, particularly the blithe attitude it emanates, it also beckons me to go against the grain. It’ s as if we’re all in an airy bubble of pale and muted hues—I’m tempted to pop it.

I satisfy this desire to stir the pot with the anti-pastel look pictured above. My inspiration for the styling and original dress design was Andy Warhol’s pop art, specifically his use of vibrant colors. The literal display of Warhol’s influence is the baguette, which is covered in prints of his iconic Marilyn Monroe silkscreen painting. Though more subtly, is the way he influenced my dress design. The black lace detail reminds me of Warhol’s blotted line technique, where the irregular lines of a print would be filled in with dynamic colors. For my dress design I chose complimentary hues to generate a true pop art feel. The calm and deep quality of the purple is amplified in contrast to the bright and active tone of the yellow backing fabric (and vice versa).

The point is not to reject the pastel color trend. I truly enjoy the refined and soft nature these hues poses, however as a designer, I’m always trying to find new ways to be inspired by color. In this instance, it took pastel colors to allow me to truly appreciate and explore the power of bold colors. My hope is that this dress snaps everyone out of their pastel trance, just for a moment, so it’s like seeing the true beauty of vibrant color with revirginized eyes.

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Looks

Feast on Fashion

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Welcome to my fantastical dinner party, a true feast for the eyes. What’s on the menu? Strewn about the table are heaping piles of necklaces on gilded plates. Their layers of bold gold flavors, mixed in with richly colored gemstones, make for a tantalizing Hors d’Oeuvre. Crystal vases overflow with silken scarves and the buffet table is overrun with bags of all shapes and sizes. To top it off, the aperitif this evening is a decadent pearl martini infused with crystals for a sweet and sumptuous ending. This is a celebratory dinner in the honor of accessories, a banquet of fashion nourishment.

Now what does one wear to this imagined revelry? Pictured above, the dusted gold sheath dress (Theia Couture) paired with champagne opera gloves, and ornate peep toe shoes (Audrey Brooke), capture the exorbitant mood. The fine beadwork detailing adorns this dress so it illuminates like perfectly polished gold, though it also makes the dress undeniably heavy. They say a queen’s crown, in all its magnificence, should have substantial weight. This is not only because it’s made up of precious metals and stones, but it’s to remind the queen of the grave responsibility and power she bears. Wearing this dress, a woman holds the power of untouchable opulence and the responsibility of great fashion upon her shoulders.

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Looks

The Retro Shock Wave

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This week’s look features vintage styles from an array of decades and celebrates the collective greatness of post-modern fashion. When the elements of the 60s, 70s, 80s, and 90s combine together, it creates something strangely familiar and all-together fabulous. The eclectic styling is pure fun and the various pieces pay tribute to some of the most eccentric fashion trends in American style history.

The cat-eye sunglasses (Artifaktori) embody the playful, mod style of the 1960s. In their time, cat-eye frames broke the mold, and this coral colored adaptation continues to do so today. Adding some groove and flare is the loose-knit lilac cardigan (H&M). Here the fringe frenzy is in full swing; a salute to the 70s diva and disco crazed. The chartreuse stilettos with a metallic heel (Guess) electrify the outfit with a dash of the 80s, while the vintage woven satchel (Gucci) elevates the look like a true Material Girl. Meanwhile, I’m living the 90s teenage dream in my high-waisted body-con skirt (BCBG Max Azria) and black crop top (American Apparel)-my touch of irresistible pop sugar.

Usually we recognize our style choices as a form of self expression; however, fashion is not a singular experience. While how we dress tells our individual stories, it also signifies the development of trends over time. We are only able to push the fashion envelope in 2015 because of the style making and risk taking fashionistas that came before us.

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