Looks

All About Proportion

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This one goes out to all the petite ladies out there who have been told they cannot wear curtain styles, like the trapeze dress. That is 100% a fashion myth. This style, also known as the tent dress, belongs to everyone. It can be worn beautifully by the tall, small, thin, and curvy. The key to this silhouette, as well as any fashion, is PROPORTION, PROPORTION, PROPORTION.

The first “P” is for proportion of length. I designed this dress for my body, which is a petite 5’2″. This means my hemlines are shorter than the industry standard, because I am shorter than the industry standard. If I had purchased this off the rack, the hemline in the front would have most likely cut me at the knee (this would have significantly shortened the look of my legs). Having the front hemline hit me several inches above the knee, while sweeping down in the back, provides the illusion of distance. And distance reads as lengthy legs.

The second “P” is for proportion of fabric. I strategically controlled the volume of fabric to serve my shape. The front of the dress is significantly less full, allowing me to carry this look. In the back of the dress I added chevroning seams, which create 3 tiers. Each tier has more volume than the next, so the dress gets exponentially fuller as the fabric cascades.

The third “P” is for proportion of design elements. The black sequin appliqué was a bold choice made on purpose. The strong look of the yoke emphasizes the shoulders, which helps me carry such a large silhouette. The yoke also extends a little beyond my natural shoulder, making my frame looking broader than it actually is. The open back is also an important design detail that helps me pull off such a full garment. The back cutout helps restore the balance between the amount of fabric used and the surface area of my body.

Do you have a style you have always wanted to wear, but struggle to find the one that looks good? I am officially open for business and taking clients! I would love to make THAT dress for you!

Love in Fashion,

Sydney

Photos by Danielle Goodman

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Looks

Feast on Fashion

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Welcome to my fantastical dinner party, a true feast for the eyes. What’s on the menu? Strewn about the table are heaping piles of necklaces on gilded plates. Their layers of bold gold flavors, mixed in with richly colored gemstones, make for a tantalizing Hors d’Oeuvre. Crystal vases overflow with silken scarves and the buffet table is overrun with bags of all shapes and sizes. To top it off, the aperitif this evening is a decadent pearl martini infused with crystals for a sweet and sumptuous ending. This is a celebratory dinner in the honor of accessories, a banquet of fashion nourishment.

Now what does one wear to this imagined revelry? Pictured above, the dusted gold sheath dress (Theia Couture) paired with champagne opera gloves, and ornate peep toe shoes (Audrey Brooke), capture the exorbitant mood. The fine beadwork detailing adorns this dress so it illuminates like perfectly polished gold, though it also makes the dress undeniably heavy. They say a queen’s crown, in all its magnificence, should have substantial weight. This is not only because it’s made up of precious metals and stones, but it’s to remind the queen of the grave responsibility and power she bears. Wearing this dress, a woman holds the power of untouchable opulence and the responsibility of great fashion upon her shoulders.

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